Archive for the ‘Outdoor’ Category

Dry Creek Falls ~ Waterfall Wednesday in The Gorge

April 20th, 2018 by Gorge Lodging

Dry Creek FallsThe hike to Dry Creek Falls is moderate to difficult, only because it is a slow 2 mile climb.  But oh, so worth it.  We hiked in on a very cold, 20° New Years Day, 2015, and found that the creek was flowing and the basalt covered with ice. Also some beautiful ice formations in the creek below the falls.

Chasing Waterfalls and Waterfall Wednesday.  According to Wiki there are at least 238 waterfalls in Oregon! I’m guessing even more than that.  Wouldn’t it be grand to witness the beauty of every one of them?  With 77 waterfalls on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge alone, we’ve set out to find them all plus those in the nearby Mt Hood National Forest, Washington and beyond. And when we do we’ll share our finds with you, our guests, so you too can set out to Chase Waterfalls.

The innkeepers of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association are eager to share their favorite spots and events for adventure and exploration in the Hood River Valley, Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, Mt Adams and Mt Hood.

Ski Mt Hood this Spring Break

February 18th, 2018 by Gorge Lodging

Ski Mt Hood this spring break.  Have your scones and ski too.
Ski Mt Hood

Stay, Play and Ski in Hood River, Oregon

Spring skiing on Mt Hood is going to be awesome at least through May.  More snow is on the way this weekend and Mt Hood Meadows Ski Resort offers discounted lift tickets to guests staying at participating Hood River area lodging properties. Many of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association inns welcome our destination guests who can purchase their discount lift tickets directly from our innkeepers.  The cost of these tickets are only $49 for adults and $30 for juniors ages 7-14.  The experienced skier can purchase a multiple day pass as can the beginner for $99.  Make sure you ask if they are a Ski Destination Program participant.  Book your room and leave the rest to us.  We will get you settled in for a comfortable nights sleep, serve fresh coffee and a hearty breakfast in the morning, issue your discount lift ticket and point you in the direction of Mt Hood Meadows Ski Resort, 34 miles from the town of Hood River and only 19 miles from Mt. Hood/Parkdale.

Why stay in a Columbia River Gorge hotel when you can stay at an Hood River Bed and Breakfast, have your scones and lift tickets, too!

The innkeepers of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association are eager to share their favorite spots and events for adventure and exploration in the Hood River Valley, Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, Mt Adams and Mt Hood.

Ski Mount Hood

January 11th, 2018 by Gorge Lodging

Skiing Mt. Hood is easy. Participating inns offer specials to stay play and ski

Details for Mt Hood Meadows Ski Resort: Tickets – Guests purchase their lift tickets directly from their host for just $64 for adults.  These are all day tickets, from open to close, including night ski when running.  While there are no block out dates, minimum stays or other restrictions, the lift tickets have to be used within the same dates as the guest lodging visit. One lift ticket per guest per night’s stay.

Details for Timberline Lodge Ski Area Tickets – Guests purchase their lift ticket vouchers directly from their host at a cost of $57 for adults.  While there are no block out dates, minimum stays or other restrictions, the lift tickets vouchers are to be used within the same dates as the guest lodging visit. One lift ticket per guest per night’s stay.

Little Multnomah Falls and Waterfall Wednesday

November 11th, 2015 by Gorge Lodging

Little Multnomah Falls is just upstream from its bigger, and slightly more famous, sibling Multnomah Falls but stunning in its simple beauty.

Multnomah Creek traverses a flat shelf to create 15 foot Little Multnomah Falls, seen from the viewing platform above Multnomah Falls, before leveling off and plunging over the basalt edge into the Columbia River Gorge.  Travel upstream and chase 3 more waterfalls.  Make the 6 mile loop and discover 7 waterfalls total.

And thus start a series of blog posts, Chasing Waterfalls and Waterfall Wednesday.  According to Wiki there are at least 238 waterfalls in Oregon!  I’m guessing even more than that.  Wouldn’t it be grand to witness the beauty of every one of them?  With 77 waterfalls on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge alone, we’ve set out to find them all plus those in the nearby Mt Hood National Forest, Washington and beyond. And when we do we’ll share our finds with you, our guests, so you too can set out to Chase Waterfalls.

The innkeepers of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association are eager to share their favorite spots and events for adventure and exploration in the Hood River Valley, Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, Mt Adams and Mt Hood.

Tundra Swans Return to Mirror Lake in the Columbia River Gorge

November 7th, 2015 by Gorge Lodging

For me the return of the Tundra Swans to Mirror Lake in the Columbia River Gorge, marks the beginning of Winter.

Mirror Lake is at the foot of Crown Point, visible from Interstate 84 just west of the Rooster Rock exit. The Lake can host upwards of 100 Tundra Swans, although as of yesterday only a few had arrived from their Arctic tundra nesting grounds.  The Scenic Colombia River Gorge is just one of Oregon’s 7 Wonders near the Old Parkdale Inn.  The other being majestic Mt Hood.

Tundra Swans dine on plant material, slugs, snails, insects and crayfish, and typically weigh from 10 to 18 pounds, averaging about 53 inches in length.  They mate for life and travel in family groups in roundtrip migrations of up to 3,725 miles.

Tundra Swans winter here and share space with Hooded Merganser, Mallards, Green-winged Teal, Northern Pintail, Bufflehead, Song Sparrow, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Steller’s Jay, Black-capped Chickadee.

Look closely at the photo for Mallards, a Great Blue Heron and a Hooded Merganser.

The innkeepers of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association are eager to share their favorite spots and events for adventure and exploration in the Hood River Valley, Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, Mt Adams and Mt Hood.

Geocaching the Columbia River Gorge and Surrounding National Forests

February 20th, 2015 by Gorge Lodging

‘Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people, from all age groups, with a strong sense of community and support for the environment.  Geocaching.com is the headquarters for the activity”

Did you know that Geocaching started in Oregon?  A little history lesson, the full version can be read on the Geocaching.com history page from where I’ve gotten this information.

“Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people from all age groups, with a strong sense of community and support for the environment.  Geocaching.com is the headquarters for the activity”  On this site you can read the history of Geocaching.

* On May 2, 2000, at approximately midnight, eastern savings time, the great blue switch* controlling selective availability was pressed. Twenty-four satellites around the globe processed their new orders, and instantly the accuracy of GPS technology improved tenfold. Tens of thousands of GPS receivers around the world had an instant upgrade. Now, anyone could “precisely pinpoint their location or the location of items (such as game) left behind for later recovery.” How right they were.

* On May 3 a GPS enthusiast, Dave Ulmer, computer consultant, wanted to test the accuracy by hiding a navigational target in the woods. He called the idea the “Great American GPS Stash Hunt” and posted it in an internet GPS users’ group. The idea was simple: Hide a container out in the woods and note the coordinates with a GPS unit.  On May 3rd he placed his own container, a black bucket, in the woods near Beavercreek, Oregon, near Portland.

* Within three days, two different readers read about his stash on the Internet, used their own GPS receivers to find the container, and shared their experiences online.  Like many new and innovative ideas on the Internet, the concept spread quickly – but this one required leaving your computer to participate.

* Within the first month, Mike Teague, the first person to find Ulmer’s stash, began gathering the online posts of coordinates around the world and documenting them on his personal home page. The “GPS Stash Hunt” mailing list was created to discuss the emerging activity.

* Geocaching.com was released to the stash-hunting community on September 2, 2000. At the time the site was launched there were 75 known caches in the world.  There are now over 1.5 million caches around the world, in only 12 years.’

This is certainly the condensed version.  Visit Geocaching.com history for the full story.  I checked to see if the Original Cache was still available, but alas, it has been archived and the Un-Original Stash placed in it’s honor.  The links will take you to their listing on Geocaching.com but if you are not logged in I’m not sure if you will be able to view.

Geocaching is Eco Friendly Travel at it’s best.  Choose a member inn of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association for your home base when Caching the Gorge

Travel Oregon’s New Bike Friendly Business promotion

March 15th, 2014 by Gorge Lodging

Oregon is becoming a top destination for cyclists, both off road and road biking, touring or simply day trippers.

Travel Oregon, the states leader in tourism, had created a program, Bike Friendly Business, to go along with the State’s Ride Oregon campaign.  When cycling through and around Oregon Bike Friendly Businesses are committed to welcoming cyclists, offer amenities riders may need and have officially been recognized by the state.

Travel-Oregon-Bike-Friendly-graphic-no-iconsBike the Columbia River Gorge, the Mt. Hood Scenic Byway, the Willamette Valley and have a comfy bed and and hearty breakfast at an bed and breakfast along the way.  A Bed and Breakfast offers so much more than a hotel.  Oregon innkeepers know the best back roads, the best places to eat, the scenic attractions you won’t want to miss.  You determine how far you want to go in one day.  The whole adventure is about 200 miles and you’ll discover why those arriving in Oregon on the Oregon Trail called this place “paradise”.  Our inn the Old Parkdale Inn B&B is recognized as a BFB and is the halfway point for this tour.  Don’t necessarily want to tour?  No problem.  We invite you to explore the many backroads of the Hood River Valley.

As a participating business we need to adhere to program requirements and recommendations.
~ as a lodging partner we must provide a secure area to store bikes
~ serve up a hearty hi-carb breakfast with larger than life servings of fruits and vegetables
~ be able to share local knowledge about where visitors can find bike shops, bike maps, good places to ride, and where to pick up a bike rental
~ our guest rooms have oulets and power strips to plug in and re-charge phone and laptops safely and we have free WiFi connection in the house and out in the garden ~ provide laundry service ~ assist in shipping home any treasures you might find while touring the Hood River Valley on the Fruit Loop

Ski, Surf, and Sip in and near the Columbia River Gorge

May 3rd, 2012 by Gorge Lodging

The town of Hood River, the hub of the Columbia River Gorge, is known in the world of sports as the windsurfing capital of America. Stiff prevailing winds and the Columbia’s strong Mt Hood, Oregon's tallest peak at 11, 240' watches over the Hood River Valleyriver currents combine to create a kind of wind tunnel that makes for legendary windsurfing and kitesurfing conditions.  South of the city, above the pear and apple orchards of the Hood River Valley, the massive glaciered peak of Mount Hood rises to fill the horizon, a perfect postcard image of Oregon.

Where can you ski in the morning and windsurf into the afternoon and evening?  And it’s blossom time in the Hood River Valley.  Take the Fruit Loop, a 35 driving tour through the valley’s orchards, forests and quiet communities.  Stroll the quaint shops, breweries, and wine tasting rooms in downtown Hood River before dinner in one of many fine dining rooms. The innkeepers of the Columbia River Gorge/Hood River B&B Association will provide unique accommodations, a superb Northwest Culinary experience, and tips on where to dine and explore.

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