Archive for the ‘Geocaching’ Category

Extra Day to Geocache in the Columbia River Gorge

February 4th, 2016 by Gorge Lodging

GeocachingWhat excites a geocachers more than a First to Find? Having an extra day to find a FTF.  Once every 4 years an extra day is added to the month of February. And we all know what that means: an Extra 24 hours to Geocache!

Celebrate with two new geocaching souvenirs.  The first souvenir can only be earned on February 29 by attending a geocaching event, one happening that morning in Hood River.  The other souvenir can be earned all weekend long (February 27-29) by getting outside and finding a geocache.

The screenshot shows caches in the Upper Hood River Valley, where our inn, Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast is located.  The star signifies the cache we placed on our property GC4FH6G Parkdale Travel Bug Inn.

“Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people from all age groups, with a strong sense of community and support for the environment.  Geocaching.com is the headquarters for the activity

The innkeepers of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association are eager to share their favorite spots and events for adventure and exploration in the Hood River Valley, Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, Mt Adams and Mt Hood.

Multnomah Falls ~ Waterfall Wednesday

December 16th, 2015 by Gorge Lodging

Multnomah Falls in the Columbia River Gorge

Multnomah FallsMultnomah Falls is the most visited recreation site in the Pacific Northwest with 2 million stopping each year to take in the views, making it to where a visit to the falls can be challenging.   As a local innkeeper I suggest visiting the falls on either ends of the day and midweek to beat the crowds.  I also suggest taking the time to hike the 6 miles Wahkeena/Multnomah Falls loop so as to ‘discover’ 6 more waterfalls, if you indeed love to chase waterfalls.

Fed by underground springs from Larch Mountain, the flow over the falls varies, usually it’s highest during winter and spring. Multnomah Falls offers one of the best places in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area to study geology exposed by floods.  Five flows of Yakima basalt are visible in the falls’ cliff face.   Geocache ‘What’s Behind Multnomah Falls’, GC14VG2, studies the different types of exposed basalt layers.

Chasing Waterfalls and Waterfall Wednesday.  According to Wiki there are at least 238 waterfalls in Oregon! I’m guessing even more than that.  Wouldn’t it be grand to witness the beauty of every one of them?  With 77 waterfalls on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge alone, we’ve set out to find them all plus those in the nearby Mt Hood National Forest, Washington and beyond. And when we do we’ll share our finds with you, our guests, so you too can set out to Chase Waterfalls.

The innkeepers of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association are eager to share their favorite spots and events for adventure and exploration in the Hood River Valley, Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area, Mt Adams and Mt Hood.

Geocaching the Columbia River Gorge and Surrounding National Forests

February 20th, 2015 by Gorge Lodging

‘Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people, from all age groups, with a strong sense of community and support for the environment.  Geocaching.com is the headquarters for the activity”

Did you know that Geocaching started in Oregon?  A little history lesson, the full version can be read on the Geocaching.com history page from where I’ve gotten this information.

“Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people from all age groups, with a strong sense of community and support for the environment.  Geocaching.com is the headquarters for the activity”  On this site you can read the history of Geocaching.

* On May 2, 2000, at approximately midnight, eastern savings time, the great blue switch* controlling selective availability was pressed. Twenty-four satellites around the globe processed their new orders, and instantly the accuracy of GPS technology improved tenfold. Tens of thousands of GPS receivers around the world had an instant upgrade. Now, anyone could “precisely pinpoint their location or the location of items (such as game) left behind for later recovery.” How right they were.

* On May 3 a GPS enthusiast, Dave Ulmer, computer consultant, wanted to test the accuracy by hiding a navigational target in the woods. He called the idea the “Great American GPS Stash Hunt” and posted it in an internet GPS users’ group. The idea was simple: Hide a container out in the woods and note the coordinates with a GPS unit.  On May 3rd he placed his own container, a black bucket, in the woods near Beavercreek, Oregon, near Portland.

* Within three days, two different readers read about his stash on the Internet, used their own GPS receivers to find the container, and shared their experiences online.  Like many new and innovative ideas on the Internet, the concept spread quickly – but this one required leaving your computer to participate.

* Within the first month, Mike Teague, the first person to find Ulmer’s stash, began gathering the online posts of coordinates around the world and documenting them on his personal home page. The “GPS Stash Hunt” mailing list was created to discuss the emerging activity.

* Geocaching.com was released to the stash-hunting community on September 2, 2000. At the time the site was launched there were 75 known caches in the world.  There are now over 1.5 million caches around the world, in only 12 years.’

This is certainly the condensed version.  Visit Geocaching.com history for the full story.  I checked to see if the Original Cache was still available, but alas, it has been archived and the Un-Original Stash placed in it’s honor.  The links will take you to their listing on Geocaching.com but if you are not logged in I’m not sure if you will be able to view.

Geocaching is Eco Friendly Travel at it’s best.  Choose a member inn of the Columbia River Gorge Bed and Breakfast Association for your home base when Caching the Gorge

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